Sons and Gillem _edited.jpg
Aberdeen University - DAVID LUMSDEN OF C
Gathering 2_edited.jpg
2003 - Lumsden Gathering 1_edited.jpg

Lumsden Tartans

modern

Before the twentieth century, almost all dyeing used vegetable dyes. The advent of chemical dyes in the mid-1800s introduced the possibility of stronger and brighter shades, which became immediately popular, appealing to Victorian sensibilities with their liking for strong colour schemes. Tartans woven in 'Modern Colours' are characterised by darker and more vivid shades.

ancient

Ancient tartan colours are lighter in tone, as if using natural dyes. In the 1950s weavers began to create lighter toned variants once the novelty of strongly toned 'Modern' dyestuffs was starting to ebb, and a fashion re-emerged for older-looking colours. The lighter tones often make a tartan's sett (pattern) easier to distinguish than in Modern colours.

reproduction

Probably the most historically authentic tartans on the market,  authentic in colour and design to those worn in 1745 and before. They have a soft muted effect reminiscent of the days when vegetable sources such as lichen, moss and alder bark provided the dyer's raw materials.

lumsden

modern

ancient

reproduction

lumsden green

Lumsden Green-.png

modern

Lumsden Green- Ancient.png

ancient

Lumsden Green- Reproduction.png

reproduction

Similar, but not identical, to the Lumsden Hunting tarta

lumsden clova

Lumsden tartan Clova.png

modern

Lumsden tartan Clova - Ancient.png

ancient

Lumsden tartan Clova - Reproduction.png

reproduction

lumsden of boghead

Lumsden of Kitore - Modern.png

modern

Lumsden of Kitore - Ancient.png

ancient

Lumsden of Kitore - Reproduction.png

reproduction

Reconstruction of a double plaid made at Boghead of Kintore in 1797 by Margaret Lumsden.

lumsden hunting

Lumsden Hunting -.png

modern

Lumsden Hunting - Ancient.png

ancient

Lumsden Hunting - Reproduction.png

reproduction

Designed by Peter MacDonald at the request of David Lumsden of Cushnie to provide a hunting tartan for the clan. Designed to provide a day tartan less bright than the other Lumsden tartans.

lumsden waistcoat

Lumsden Waistcoat Modern.png

modern

Lumsden Waistcoat Ancient.png

ancient

Lumsden Waistcoat Reproduction.png

reproduction

This threadcount was taken from a waistcoat which is believed to date from the 1790s and may have belonged to Andrew Lumsden, one of Prince Charles's secretaries.

lumsden tartan gallery