Sir_James_Lumsden.png

Sir James Lumsden 
(Lord Provost)

1808–1879

James Lumsden DL (1808–1879) was a Scottish stationer and merchant who served as Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1866 to 1869. He was known as the Knight of Arden.

The eldest son of James Lumsden who served as Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1843 to 1846,[1][2] he was born at 60 Queen Street, Glasgow in 1808.[3] His mother was Margaret Gourlay. He had one younger brother, known as George Lumsden of Drumsheugh Gardens. He was educated at Glasgow Grammar School. James matriculated at Glasgow University in 1821 but did not graduate.[4]

He joined the family publishing and stationery business of James Lumsden & Son, and was made a full partner in 1834. By 1840 he had his own house at 121 Bath Street.[5]

He was chairman of the Clydesdale Bank from 1851 until his death.[6] He was also chairman of the Glasgow and South Western Railway and the Clyde Navigation Trust. He was the final chairman of the Clyde Shipping Company before it was sold in 1857.[4] A Liberal politician, he joined the Glasgow town Council in 1860, serving as Lord Provost from 1866 to 1869. He was knighted in 1868 in a ceremony linked to the laying of the foundation of the new university buildings at Gilmorehill. His title Sir James Lumsden of Arden reflected the estate of Arden near Loch Lomond which he had purchased in 1867.[7] In later life he lived at 124 Bath Street.[8] He died in Glasgow on 22 March 1879.[citation needed]

Family

He married Margaret Gourlay. They had two sons, James and George,[1] who both initially joined the family firm. James Jr was head of the Clydesdale Bank from 1851 until his death,[10] and was also Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1866 to 1869. He was knighted in 1868 as Sir James Lumsden of Arden.[11]

Portrait_of_Sir_James_Lumsden (1818-1879).jpg

Gazetteer for Scotland

Businessman and Lord Provost of Glasgow. Born in Glasgow, the son of an engraver and publisher, Lumsden was educated at the Glasgow Grammer School. He was apprenticed to his father and went on to build James Lumsden & Sons into a successful stationery business.

In 1812, Lumsden accompanied Henry Bell of the maiden voyage of the steam-ship the Comet. Between 1822 and 1825, he sat on the Glasgow Town Council and again from 1833. In 1843, he was elected Lord Provost of the city and in this capacity visited Paris in 1845.

In 1838, Lumsden was one of the founders of the Clydesdale Bank.

Lumsden served as President of the Incorporated Company of Stationers in Glasgow on three occasions (1815, 1822 and 1830). He gave generously to the City of Glasgow Benevolent Association and served as treasurer of Glasgow Royal Infirmary for nineteen years.

He was buried in the High Churchyard and is remembered by a statue in front of the Royal Infirmary.

https://www.scottish-places.info/people/famousfirst1207.html

Wikipedia

James Lumsden DL (1808–1879) was a Scottish stationer and merchant who served as Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1866 to 1869. He was known as the Knight of Arden.

The eldest son of James Lumsden who served as Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1843 to 1846,[1][2] he was born at 60 Queen Street, Glasgow in 1808.[3] His mother was Margaret Gourlay. He had one younger brother, known as George Lumsden of Drumsheugh Gardens. He was educated at Glasgow Grammar School. James matriculated at Glasgow University in 1821 but did not graduate.[4]

He joined the family publishing and stationery business of James Lumsden & Son, and was made a full partner in 1834. By 1840 he had his own house at 121 Bath Street.[5]

He was chairman of the Clydesdale Bank from 1851 until his death.[6] He was also chairman of the Glasgow and South Western Railway and the Clyde Navigation Trust. He was the final chairman of the Clyde Shipping Company before it was sold in 1857.[4] A Liberal politician, he joined the Glasgow town Council in 1860, serving as Lord Provost from 1866 to 1869. He was knighted in 1868 in a ceremony linked to the laying of the foundation of the new university buildings at Gilmorehill. His title Sir James Lumsden of Arden reflected the estate of Arden near Loch Lomond which he had purchased in 1867.[7] In later life he lived at 124 Bath Street.[8] He died in Glasgow on 22 March 1879.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ a b c d James Lumsden, 100 Glasgow Men (published 1885)

  2. ^ Jones Directory og Glasgow 1787

  3. ^ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: James Lumsden

  4. ^ "(30) - Towns > Glasgow > 1787 - Reprint of Jones's directory; or, Useful pocket companion for the year 1787 - Scottish Directories - National Library of Scotland".

  5. ^ a b James Lumsden 1778 - 1856, Gazetteer for Scotland

  6. ^ Glasgow Post Office Directory 1840

  7. ^ James Lumsden (Mitchell Library, Glasgow Collection), The Glasgow Story

  8. ^ Illustrated Catalogue of the Exhibition of Portraits in the New Galleries of Art in Corporation Buildings

  9. ^ Illustrated Catalogue of the Exhibition of Portraits in the New Galleries of Art in Corporation Buildings

  10. ^ Sir James Lumsden (Mitchell Library, The Bailie), The Glasgow Story

  11. ^ Sir James Lumsden, 100 Glasgow Men (published 1885)

  1. James Lumsden, 100 Glasgow Men (published 1885)

  2. James Lumsden 1778 - 1856, Gazetteer for Scotland

  3. Glasgow Post Office Directory 1818

  4. Sir James Lumsden, University of Glasgow

  5. Glasgow Post Office Directory 1840

  6. Sir James Lumsden (Mitchell Library, The Bailie), The Glasgow Story

  7. Sir James Lumsden, 100 Glasgow Men (published 1885)

  8. Glasgow Post Office Directory 1875